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You know what I mean by glory

Si Walker, 28th January 2015

A football team celebrating a victory

I think humans understand glory very well, for all it's religious connotations

I was sat in Burnley College waiting for the next part of my coaching course and a book on a shelf caught my eye about Ryan Giggs (long-time Manchester United player). I was a massive Ryan Giggs fan as a teenager and so I took a trip down memory lane.

One phrase about him sat up and hit me in the face. Brian Kidd who was Assistant to Alex Ferguson, wrote about the 'glory' of Ryan Giggs. He said:

'glory is a phrase many people would think they don't understand when used in a religious context'

'Through all his glory he has remained the same...'

Through all his glory! What a strange and intriguing phrase.

You see, glory is a phrase many people would think they don't understand when used in a religious context. But use it in a football context and we get it.

Forget the Man United thing for a moment. Fans of any famous person would get what is meant by the term; that the person has a weight of brilliance, a glimmer of something otherworldly. They are the sort of person who towers above the efforts of others in their field and draws admiration to themselves.

When I kick a football, there is not a lot of glory to it. But there is a whole lot of glory when Giggs chips it and it curves beneath the cross bar. And when our team lift the trophy and the crowd goes wild, we get it. When our favourite band roar into the chorus in the stadium, we get it.

We understand something of glory, even if we think we don't.

'the ultimate soaring of our senses will be when Christ comes back and is crowned with glory'

Now can I tell you about God and the weight of his glory?

His glory towers over all the little glimpses we get now of human glory. There will one day be such a testimony of his goodness, such a roar of excitement and delight in his achievements.

The Bible says Jesus is coming back. So many people are blind to it now, but the ultimate soaring of our senses will be when Christ comes back and is crowned with glory, majesty and power. Are we going to be there for the party amongst the celebrators, eager to lavish him with praise, overwhelmed by the smell of victory?

Kidd was keen to remember the times when he and Giggs served together-- we instinctively want to re-tell these tales of glory: 'If I was able to help Ryan...then that has been my privilege', he writes.

Will we be able to remember the great triumphs, when we fought at Jesus' side side for the gospel and saw people become Christians and lives changed beyond measure? Or will we just have tales of lesser glories, that were given to us for a fleeting moment? Here endeth the sermon.